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The Outsiders Critical Essays

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❶To realize that people and events may not be purely right or wrong, good or bad, can be frightening. The Outsiders The Outsiders, an exciting tale by S.

The Outsiders Themes

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by S.E. Hinton

Because he is from the poor, East Side of town, his place in life is unfairly predetermined. The evolution of the family relationships is a recurrent theme in the novel. Family relationships are strained during the teen years, but in the Curtis family, the right to stay together as a family is a constant struggle. Since the death of their parents, Darry has assumed the responsibility of guardianship for Pony and Soda, and under that pressure he has aged beyond his years.

He no longer views the two boys as siblings, but rather as a responsibility. Darry recognizes Ponyboy's potential and has high expectations for him. Ponyboy complains that Darry is a stricter disciplinarian than his father, but by the end of the book he understands Darry's role: My father didn't yell at me as much as he does. Pony struggles with his expectations for Soda. He is self-conscious about the fact that Soda has dropped out of school, and he wants him to finish his education.

Soda did not do well in school, did not like school, and is perfectly content to work in a gas station — a job he loves. Soda also believes that he is doing the right thing by helping to support his family. Pony doesn't care about any of those facts; he just wants Soda to go back to school. Gang relationships are included in the theme of family love. Ponyboy's gang members need the support and security that they find in the gang. The home life situations that these boys find themselves in are often abusive.

They have turned to the gang for the love and support that should have come from parents. Johnny is painfully aware of the difference between the gang and a family and through him Pony begins to understand how lucky he is to have caring family members: I thought about it for a minute — Darry and Sodapop were my brothers and I loved both of them. The third major theme that runs through The Outsiders is the use of colors in a black and white world.

Adolescents have a tendency to embrace people and events as absolutes. For example, someone or something is either right or wrong; there can be no middle ground.

The characters in The Outsiders are either Socs or greasers. People are either rich or poor, good or bad. Hinton descriptively uses color throughout the book to define and add depth to the characters in their environments. Early in the book, she associates warm colors with the Socs and cool colors with the greasers.

Warmth usually is equated with inside and cool is associated with outside, and the colors reflect the characters' positions in society: The greasers view the Socs as insiders and themselves as outsiders. Using many descriptive colors, Hinton paints the greasers as outsiders.

In her original descriptions of Ponyboy's gang, she uses cool colors: Ponyboy's eyes are greenish-gray, Darry's eyes "are like two pieces of pale blue-green ice," Dally's eyes are "blue, blazing ice, cold with a hatred," and Two-Bit Mathews has gray eyes. Dally is the exception to the rule, "His hair was almost white it was so blond.

Furthermore, when discussing Gone with the Wind, Johnny says that he views Dally as a Southern gentleman, as a man with a fixed personal code of behavior. As hostile and dangerous as the greaser-Soc rivalry becomes, the boys from each group have the comfort of knowing how their male friends will react to their male enemies. When Randy and Bob approach Ponyboy and Johnny, everyone involved knows to expect a fight of some sort.

It is only when the female members of the Soc contingent start to act friendly toward the greasers that animosities blur and true trouble starts brewing. With these plot elements, Hinton conveys the idea that cross-gender interaction creates unpredictable results.

This message underscores the importance of male bonding in the novel to the creation of unity and structure. Home Literature The Outsiders Themes. Themes Motifs Symbols Key Facts. Themes Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.

Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor The Outsiders tells the story of two groups of teenagers whose bitter rivalry stems from socioeconomic differences. Honor Among the Lawless.

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The Outsiders: Theme Jess Martin Human Nature The Outsiders, an enthralling tale by S.E. Hinton, is an excellent story about the hardships and triumphs experienced by the Greasers and the Socs, two rival gangs 2 / Jess Martin The Theme Of The Outsiders triumphs experienced by the Greasers and the Socs, two rival gangs.

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As the title suggests, The Outsiders is a theme in itself. Looking at life as an outsider and feeling as though one is being treated as an outsider is a matter of perspective or point of view. Looking at life as an outsider and feeling as though one is being treated as an outsider is a matter of perspective or point of view.

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The Outsiders study guide contains a biography of author S. E. Hinton, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. The central theme of the novel is class conflict. The Greasers are considered "outsiders" in their community because they live on the wrong side and don't fit in with the Socs, a gang of rich kids.

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The Outsiders What is the theme for The Outsiders? Special offer for our new customers: Get 25% discount when you place an order now on this website. To redeem your 25% discount fill the order form and on the discount button enter the code: 25%less to . The Outsiders Essay. The Outsiders Essay – Describe an interesting theme from a text you have studied. Explain why this theme is interesting. In the novel “The Outsiders” by S.E Hinton an important theme is family and friendship.